Expanding Plume from DARTs Impact

APOD: 2022 October 5 - Expanding Plume from DARTs Impact Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. Expanding Plume from DART's Impact Video Credit: Les Makes Observatory, J. Berthier, F. Vachier, A. Klotz, P. Thierry, T. Santana-Ros, ESA NEOCC, D. Föhring, E. Petrescu, M. Micheli Explanation: What happens if you crash a spaceship into an asteroid?In the case of NASA's DART spaceship and the small asteroid Dimorphos, as happened last week, you get quite a plume.The goal of the planned impact was planetary protection -- to show that the path of an asteroid can be slightly altered, so that, if done right, a big space rock will miss the Earth.The high brightness of the plume, though, was unexpected by many, and what it means remains a topic of research.One possibility is that 170-meter wide Dimorphos is primarily a rubble pile asteroid and the collision dispersed some of the rubble in the pile. The featured time-lapse video covers about 20 minutes and was taken from the Les Makes Observatory on France's Reunion Island, off the southeast coast of southern Africa. One of many Earth-based observatories...

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NGC 4631: The Whale Galaxy

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 6 NGC 4631: The Whale Galaxy Image Credit &Copyright: Michael Sherick Explanation: NGC 4631is a big beautiful spiral galaxy.Seen edge-on, it liesonly 25 million light-years away in the well-trained northernconstellationCanes Venatici.The galaxy's slightly distorted wedge shape suggests tosome a cosmic herring and to others its popular moniker,The Whale Galaxy.Either way,it is similar in size to our own Milky Way.In this sharp color image,the galaxy's yellowish core, dark dust clouds,bright blue star clusters, and red star forming regions are easyto spot.A companion galaxy, the small elliptical NGC 4627 is just above theWhale Galaxy.Faintstar streams seen in deep images are the remnants of smallcompanion galaxies disrupted by repeated encounters with the Whalein the distant past.The Whale Galaxy is also known to have spouteda halo of hot gas glowingin X-rays. Tomorrow's picture: jovian close-up<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA ScienceActivation& Michigan Tech. U.

Star Forming Eagle Nebula without Stars

APOD: 2022 October 4 - Star Forming Eagle Nebula without Stars Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 4 Star-Forming Eagle Nebula without Stars Image Credit & Copyright: Yannick Akar Explanation: The whole thing looks like an eagle. A closer look at the Eagle Nebula's center,however, shows thebrightregion is actually a window into the center of a larger dark shell of dust. Through this window, a brightly-lit workshop appearswhere a whole open cluster of stars is being formed. In this cavity tall pillars and round globules of dark dust and cold molecular gasremain where stars are still forming. Paradoxically, it is perhaps easier to appreciate this impressive factory of star formation by seeing it without its stars -- which have been digitally removed in the featured image.The Eagle emission nebula,tagged M16, lies about 6500light years away, spans about 20 light-years, and is visible withbinoculars towardthe constellation of the Serpent(Serpens). Creating this picture involved over 22 hours of imaging and combining colors emitted specifically by hydrogen (red), and oxygen (blue). Tomorrow's picture: space dart debris <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS|...

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Expanding Plume from DARTs Impact

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. Expanding Plume from DART's Impact Video Credit: Les Makes Observatory, J. Berthier, F. Vachier, A. Klotz, P. Thierry, T. Santana-Ros, ESA NEOCC, D. Föhring, E. Petrescu, M. Micheli Explanation: What happens if you crash a spaceship into an asteroid?In the case of NASA's DART spaceship and the small asteroid Dimorphos, as happened last week, you get quite a plume.The goal of the planned impact was planetary protection -- to show that the path of an asteroid can be slightly altered, so that, if done right, a big space rock will miss the Earth.The high brightness of the plume, though, was unexpected by many, and what it means remains a topic of research.One possibility is that 170-meter wide Dimorphos is primarily a rubble pile asteroid and the collision dispersed some of the rubble in the pile. The featured time-lapse video covers about 20 minutes and was taken from the Les Makes Observatory on France's Reunion Island, off the southeast coast of southern Africa. One of many Earth-based observatories following the impact, the initial...

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Jupiters Europa from Spacecraft Juno

APOD: 2022 October 3 - Jupiters Europa from Spacecraft Juno Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 3 Jupiter's Europa from Spacecraft Juno Image Credit & License: NASA,JPL-Caltech,SwRI,MSSS;Processing: Andrea Luck Explanation: What mysteries might be solved by peering into this crystal ball? In this case, the ball is actually a moon of Jupiter, the crystals are ice, and the moon is not only dirty but cracked beyond repair. Nevertheless, speculation is rampant that oceans exist under Europa's fractured ice-plains that could support life. Europa, roughly the size of Earth's Moon, is pictured here in an image taken a few days ago when the Jupiter-orbiting robotic spacecraft Juno passed within 325 kilometers of its streaked and shifting surface.Underground oceans are thought likely because Europa undergoes global flexing due to its changing gravitational attraction with Jupiter during its slightly elliptical orbit, and this flexing heats the interior.Studying Juno's close-upimages may further humanity's understanding not only of Europa and the early Solar System but also of the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the universe. Tomorrow's picture: big eagle <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search|...

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Star Forming Eagle Nebula without Stars

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 4 Star-Forming Eagle Nebula without Stars Image Credit & Copyright: Yannick Akar Explanation: The whole thing looks like an eagle. A closer look at the Eagle Nebula's center,however, shows thebrightregion is actually a window into the center of a larger dark shell of dust. Through this window, a brightly-lit workshop appearswhere a whole open cluster of stars is being formed. In this cavity tall pillars and round globules of dark dust and cold molecular gasremain where stars are still forming. Paradoxically, it is perhaps easier to appreciate this impressive factory of star formation by seeing it without its stars -- which have been digitally removed in the featured image.The Eagle emission nebula,tagged M16, lies about 6500light years away, spans about 20 light-years, and is visible withbinoculars towardthe constellation of the Serpent(Serpens). Creating this picture involved over 22 hours of imaging and combining colors emitted specifically by hydrogen (red), and oxygen (blue). Tomorrow's picture: space dart debris <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors...

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Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002

APOD: 2022 October 2 - Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002 Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 2 Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002 Image Credit: F. Schinzel et al. (NRAO, NSF), Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (DRAO),NASA (IRAS); Composition: Jayanne English (U. Manitoba) Explanation: What could shoot out a neutron star like a cannon ball?A supernova. About 10,000 years ago, the supernova that created the nebular remnant CTB 1 not only destroyed a massive star but blasted its newly formed neutron star core -- a pulsar -- out into the Milky Way Galaxy. The pulsar, spinning 8.7 times a second, was discovered using downloadable software Einstein@Home searching through data taken by NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Traveling over 1,000 kilometers per second, the pulsar PSR J0002+6216 (J0002 for short) has already left the supernova remnant CTB 1, and is even fast enough to leave our Galaxy.Pictured, the trail of the pulsar is visible extending to the lower left of the supernova remnant. The featured image is a combination of radio images from the VLA and DRAO radio observatories, as well as data archived...

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Jupiters Europa from Spacecraft Juno

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 3 Jupiter's Europa from Spacecraft Juno Image Credit & License: NASA,JPL-Caltech,SwRI,MSSS;Processing: Andrea Luck Explanation: What mysteries might be solved by peering into this crystal ball? In this case, the ball is actually a moon of Jupiter, the crystals are ice, and the moon is not only dirty but cracked beyond repair. Nevertheless, speculation is rampant that oceans exist under Europa's fractured ice-plains that could support life. Europa, roughly the size of Earth's Moon, is pictured here in an image taken a few days ago when the Jupiter-orbiting robotic spacecraft Juno passed within 325 kilometers of its streaked and shifting surface.Underground oceans are thought likely because Europa undergoes global flexing due to its changing gravitational attraction with Jupiter during its slightly elliptical orbit, and this flexing heats the interior.Studying Juno's close-upimages may further humanity's understanding not only of Europa and the early Solar System but also of the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the universe. Tomorrow's picture: big eagle <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD|...

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Lunation Matrix

APOD: 2022 October 1 - Lunation Matrix Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 1 Lunation Matrix Image Credit &Copyright: Tunc Tezel(TWAN) Explanation: Observe the Moonevery night and you'll see its visible sunlit portion gradually change.In phases progressingfrom New Moon to Full Moon to New Moon again,a lunar cycle or lunation is completed in about 29.5 days.Top left to bottom right, this 7x4 matrix of telescopicimages captures the range of lunar phases for 28 consecutive nights,from the evening of July 29 to the morning of August 26,following analmost complete lunation.No image was taken 24 hours or so just after and just beforeNew Moon,when the lunar phase is at best a narrow crescent, close to the Sunand really hard to see.Finding mostly clear Mediterranean skies required an occasionalroad trip to complete this lunar cycle project,imaging in early evening for the first half andlate evening and early morning for the second half of the lunation.Since all the images are registered at the same scaleyou can use this matrix to track thechange in the Moon's apparent size during the single lunation.For extra credit, find the...

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Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 2 Supernova Cannon Expels Pulsar J0002 Image Credit: F. Schinzel et al. (NRAO, NSF), Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (DRAO),NASA (IRAS); Composition: Jayanne English (U. Manitoba) Explanation: What could shoot out a neutron star like a cannon ball?A supernova. About 10,000 years ago, the supernova that created the nebular remnant CTB 1 not only destroyed a massive star but blasted its newly formed neutron star core -- a pulsar -- out into the Milky Way Galaxy. The pulsar, spinning 8.7 times a second, was discovered using downloadable software Einstein@Home searching through data taken by NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-Ray Observatory. Traveling over 1,000 kilometers per second, the pulsar PSR J0002+6216 (J0002 for short) has already left the supernova remnant CTB 1, and is even fast enough to leave our Galaxy.Pictured, the trail of the pulsar is visible extending to the lower left of the supernova remnant. The featured image is a combination of radio images from the VLA and DRAO radio observatories, as well as data archived from NASA's orbiting IRAS infrared...

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Equinox Sunrise Around the World

APOD: 2022 September 30 - Equinox Sunrise Around the World Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 September 30 Equinox Sunrise Around the World Collage Image Copyright:Luca Vanzella Explanation: A planet-wide collaborationresulted in this remarkable array ofsunrise photographs taken around theSeptember 2022 equinox.The images were contributed by 24 photographers, one in each of24 nautical time zones around the world.Unlike more complicated civil time zone boundaries,the 24 nautical time zones are simply15 degree longitude bands corresponding to 1 hour stepsthat span the globe.Start at the upper right for the first to experience a sunrise inthe nautical time zone corresponding to Coordinated Universal Time(UTC) + 12 hours.In that time zone, the photographer waslocated in Christchurch, New Zealand.Travel to the west by looking down the columnand then moving to the column toward the left forlater sunrises as the time zone offset in hours from UTC decreases.Or,you can watch a video ofSeptember 2022 equinox sunrisesaround planet Earth. Tomorrow's picture: Observe the Moon<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA...

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Lunation Matrix

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 1 Lunation Matrix Image Credit &Copyright: Tunc Tezel(TWAN) Explanation: Observe the Moonevery night and you'll see its visible sunlit portion gradually change.In phases progressingfrom New Moon to Full Moon to New Moon again,a lunar cycle or lunation is completed in about 29.5 days.Top left to bottom right, this 7x4 matrix of telescopicimages captures the range of lunar phases for 28 consecutive nights,from the evening of July 29 to the morning of August 26,following analmost complete lunation.No image was taken 24 hours or so just after and just beforeNew Moon,when the lunar phase is at best a narrow crescent, close to the Sunand really hard to see.Finding mostly clear Mediterranean skies required an occasionalroad trip to complete this lunar cycle project,imaging in early evening for the first half andlate evening and early morning for the second half of the lunation.Since all the images are registered at the same scaleyou can use this matrix to track thechange in the Moon's apparent size during the single lunation.For extra credit, find the lunar phase...

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DART Asteroid Impact from Space

APOD: 2022 September 29 - DART Asteroid Impact from Space Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 September 29 DART Asteroid Impact from Space Image Credit: ASI /NASA Explanation: Fifteen daysbefore impact,the DART spacecraft deployed a small companion satelliteto document its historicplanetary defense technologydemonstration.Provided by the Italian Space Agency, the Light Italian CubeSat forImaging Asteroids, aka LICIACube,recorded this image of the event'saftermath.A cloud of ejecta is seen near the right edge of the framecaptured only minutesfollowing DART's impact withtarget asteroid Dimorphos while LICIACube was about 80kilometers away.Presently about 11 million kilometers from Earth, 160 meter diameter Dimorphos is a moonlet orbiting 780 meter diameterasteroid Didymos.Didymos is seen off center in the LICIACube image.Over the coming weeks, ground-based telescopic observations will look for asmall change in Dimorphos' orbitaround Didymostoevaluatehow effectively the DART impact deflected its target. Tomorrow's picture: 24 sunrises<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA ScienceActivation& Michigan Tech. U.

Equinox Sunrise Around the World

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 September 30 Equinox Sunrise Around the World Collage Image Copyright:Luca Vanzella Explanation: A planet-wide collaborationresulted in this remarkable array ofsunrise photographs taken around theSeptember 2022 equinox.The images were contributed by 24 photographers, one in each of24 nautical time zones around the world.Unlike more complicated civil time zone boundaries,the 24 nautical time zones are simply15 degree longitude bands corresponding to 1 hour stepsthat span the globe.Start at the upper right for the first to experience a sunrise inthe nautical time zone corresponding to Coordinated Universal Time(UTC) + 12 hours.In that time zone, the photographer waslocated in Christchurch, New Zealand.Travel to the west by looking down the columnand then moving to the column toward the left forlater sunrises as the time zone offset in hours from UTC decreases.Or, you can watch a video ofSeptember 2022 equinox sunrisesaround planet Earth. Tomorrow's picture: Observe the Moon<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important...

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DART Asteroid Impact from Space

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 September 29 DART Asteroid Impact from Space Image Credit: ASI /NASA Explanation: Fifteen daysbefore impact,the DART spacecraft deployed a small companion satelliteto document its historicplanetary defense technologydemonstration.Provided by the Italian Space Agency, the Light Italian CubeSat forImaging Asteroids, aka LICIACube,recorded this image of the event'saftermath.A cloud of ejecta is seen near the right edge of the framecaptured only minutesfollowing DART's impact withtarget asteroid Dimorphos while LICIACube was about 80kilometers away.Presently about 11 million kilometers from Earth, 160 meter diameter Dimorphos is a moonlet orbiting 780 meter diameterasteroid Didymos.Didymos is seen off center in the LICIACube image.Over the coming weeks, ground-based telescopic observations will look for asmall change in Dimorphos' orbitaround Didymostoevaluatehow effectively the DART impact deflected its target. Tomorrow's picture: 24 sunrises<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA ScienceActivation& Michigan Tech. U.