M100: A Grand Design Spiral Galaxy

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 May 2 M100: A Grand Design Spiral Galaxy Image Credit &Copyright:Drew Evans Explanation: Majestic on a truly cosmic scale, M100 is appropriately known as a grand design spiral galaxy. The large galaxy of over 100 billion stars haswell-defined spiral arms, similar to our own Milky Way. One of the brightest members of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, M100,also known as NGC 4321 is 56 million light-years distant toward the well-groomed constellationComa Berenices. In this telescopic image, the face-on grand design spiral shares a nearly 1 degree wide field-of-view with slightly less conspicuousedge-on spiral NGC 4312 (at upper right).The 21 hour long equivalent exposure from a dark sky site nearFlagstaff, Arizona, planet Earth,reveals M100's bright blue star clusters and intricate winding dust lanes which are hallmarks of this class of galaxies. Measurements of variable stars in M100 have played an important role in determining the size and age of the Universe. Tomorrow's picture: cloudy exoplanet <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert...

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Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy

APOD: 2024 April 26 - Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 26 Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy Image Credit &Copyright:Markus Horn Explanation: In northern hemisphere spring,bright star Regulus is easy to spot above the eastern horizon.The alpha star of the constellation Leo, Regulus is the spiky starcentered in thistelescopic field of view.A mere 79 light-years distant,Regulusis ahot, rapidly spinning starthat is known to be part of a multiple star system.Not quite lost in the glare, the fuzzy patch just below Regulusis diffuse starlight from small galaxy Leo I.Leo I is adwarf spheroidal galaxy,a member of the Local Groupof galaxies dominated by ourMilky Way Galaxyand the Andromeda Galaxy(M31).About 800 thousand light-years away, Leo Iis thought to be the most distant of theknown small satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way.But dwarf galaxy Leo I has shownevidenceof a supermassive black holeat its center, comparable in mass to the black hole at the centerof the Milky Way. Tomorrow's picture: all around eclipse <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU)...

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All Sky Moon Shadow

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 27 All Sky Moon Shadow Image Credit &Copyright:Tunc Tezel(TWAN) Explanation: If the Sun is upbut the sky is dark and the horizon is bright all around,you might be standing in the Moon's shadow during a total eclipse ofthe Sun.In fact, the all-sky Moon shadow shown in thiscomposited panoramic view was capturedfrom a farm near Shirley, Arkansas, planet Earth.The exposures were made under clear skies during theApril 8 total solar eclipse.For that location near the center line of the Moon's shadow track,totality lasted over 4 minutes.Along with the solar corona surrounding thesilhouette of the Moonplanets and stars were visible during the total eclipse phase.Easiest to see hereare bright planets Venus and Jupiter, to the lower rightand upper left of the eclipsed Sun. Tomorrow's picture: rings around the ring <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

NGC 604: Giant Stellar Nursery

APOD: 2024 April 25 - NGC 604: Giant Stellar Nursery Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 25 NGC 604: Giant Stellar Nursery Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA,STScI Explanation: Located some 3 million light-years away in the arms of nearby spiralgalaxy M33,giant stellar nurseryNGC 604 isabout 1,300 light-years across.That's nearly 100 times the size of the Milky Way'sOrion Nebula, the closest large star formingregion to planet Earth.In fact, among the star forming regions within the Local Group ofgalaxies, NGC 604 is second in size only to 30 Doradus,also known asthe Tarantula Nebula in theLarge Magellanic Cloud.Cavernous bubbles and cavities in NGC 604fill this stunning infrared image from theJames Webb Space Telescope's NIRCam.They are carved out by energetic stellar windsfrom the region'smore than 200 hot, massive, young stars, all still in earlystages of their lives. Tomorrow's picture: Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 26 Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy Image Credit &Copyright:Markus Horn Explanation: In northern hemisphere spring,bright star Regulus is easy to spot above the eastern horizon.The alpha star of the constellation Leo, Regulus is the spiky starcentered in thistelescopic field of view.A mere 79 light-years distant,Regulusis ahot, rapidly spinning starthat is known to be part of a multiple star system.Not quite lost in the glare, the fuzzy patch just below Regulusis diffuse starlight from small galaxy Leo I.Leo I is adwarf spheroidal galaxy,a member of the Local Groupof galaxies dominated by ourMilky Way Galaxyand the Andromeda Galaxy(M31).About 800 thousand light-years away, Leo Iis thought to be the most distant of theknown small satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way.But dwarf galaxy Leo Ihas shownevidenceof a supermassive black holeat its center, comparable in mass to the black hole at the centerof the Milky Way. Tomorrow's picture: all around eclipse <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific...

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NGC 604: Giant Stellar Nursery

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 25 NGC 604: Giant Stellar Nursery Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA,STScI Explanation: Located some 3 million light-years away in the arms of nearby spiralgalaxy M33,giant stellar nurseryNGC 604 isabout 1,300 light-years across.That's nearly 100 times the size of the Milky Way'sOrion Nebula, the closest large star formingregion to planet Earth.In fact, among the star forming regions within the Local Group ofgalaxies, NGC 604 is second in size only to 30 Doradus,also known asthe Tarantula Nebula in theLarge Magellanic Cloud.Cavernous bubbles and cavities in NGC 604fill this stunning infrared image from theJames Webb Space Telescope's NIRCam.They are carved out by energetic stellar windsfrom the region'smore than 200 hot, massive, young stars, all still in earlystages of their lives. Tomorrow's picture: Regulus and the Dwarf Galaxy <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

Diamonds in the Sky

Diamonds in the Sky

The Great Carina Nebula

APOD: 2024 April 19 - The Great Carina Nebula Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 19 The Great Carina Nebula Image Credit &Copyright:Demison Lopes Explanation: A jewel of the southern sky,the GreatCarina Nebula is more modestly known as NGC 3372.One of ourGalaxy'slargest star forming regions, it spans over 300 light-years.Like the smaller, more northerly Great Orion Nebula, the Carina Nebula is easily visible to the unaided eye.But at a distance of 7,500 light-years it lies some 5 times farther away.This stunning telescopic view revealsremarkable details of the region's glowing filaments of interstellar gasand obscuring cosmic dust clouds.TheCarina Nebulais home to young, extremely massive stars, includingthe still enigmatic variable Eta Carinae, astar with well over 100 times the mass of the Sun. Eta Carinaeis the bright star above the central dark notch in this field and left of thedusty Keyhole Nebula (NGC 3324). Tomorrow's picture: diamond in the sky <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA...

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Facing NGC 1232

APOD: 2024 April 18 - Facing NGC 1232 Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 18 Facing NGC 1232 Image Credit &Copyright:Neil Corke Explanation: From our vantage point in theMilky Way Galaxy,we see NGC 1232 face-on.Nearly 200,000 light-years across, the big, beautifulspiral galaxyis located some 47 million light-years away in the flowing southernconstellation of Eridanus.This sharp, multi-color, telescopic imageof NGC 1232 includes remarkable details of the distant island universe.From the core outward, the galaxy'scolors change from the yellowishlight of old stars in the center to young blue starclusters and reddish star forming regions along the grand, sweepingspiral arms.NGC 1232's apparent, small, barred-spiral companion galaxyis cataloged as NGC 1232A.Distance estimates place it much farther though,around 300 million light-years away, and unlikely to beinteracting with NGC 1232. Of course, the prominent bright star with the spiky appearanceis much closer than NGC 1232 and lies well within our own Milky Way. Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA...

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The Great Carina Nebula

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 19 The Great Carina Nebula Image Credit &Copyright:Demison Lopes Explanation: A jewel of the southern sky,the GreatCarina Nebula is more modestly known as NGC 3372.One of ourGalaxy'slargest star forming regions, it spans over 300 light-years.Like the smaller, more northerly Great Orion Nebula, the Carina Nebula is easily visible to the unaided eye.But at a distance of 7,500 light-years it lies some 5 times farther away.This stunning telescopic view revealsremarkable details of the region's glowing filaments of interstellar gasand obscuring cosmic dust clouds.TheCarina Nebulais home to young, extremely massive stars, includingthe still enigmatic variable Eta Carinae, astar with well over 100 times the mass of the Sun. Eta Carinaeis the bright star above the central dark notch in this field and left of thedusty Keyhole Nebula (NGC 3324). Tomorrow's picture: diamond in the sky <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech....

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Facing NGC 1232

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 18 Facing NGC 1232 Image Credit &Copyright:Neil Corke Explanation: From our vantage point in theMilky Way Galaxy,we see NGC 1232 face-on.Nearly 200,000 light-years across, the big, beautifulspiral galaxyis located some 47 million light-years away in the flowing southernconstellation of Eridanus.This sharp, multi-color, telescopic imageof NGC 1232 includes remarkable details of the distant island universe.From the core outward, the galaxy'scolors change from the yellowishlight of old stars in the center to young blue starclusters and reddish star forming regions along the grand, sweepingspiral arms.NGC 1232's apparent, small, barred-spiral companion galaxyis cataloged as NGC 1232A.Distance estimates place it much farther though,around 300 million light-years away, and unlikely to beinteracting with NGC 1232. Of course, the prominent bright star with the spiky appearanceis much closer than NGC 1232 and lies well within our own Milky Way. Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA...

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Total Totality

APOD: 2024 April 12 - Total Totality Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 12 Total Totality Image Credit &Copyright:Daniel Korona Explanation: Baily's beadsoften appear at the boundaries of thetotal phase of an eclipse of the Sun.Pearls of sunlight still beaming through gaps in therugged terrain alongthe lunar limb silhouette, their appearance is recordedin this dramatic timelapse composite.The series of images follows the Moon's edge frombeginning through the end of totality during April 8's solar eclipsefrom Durango, Mexico.They also capture pinkish prominences of plasmaarcing high above the edge of the active Sun.One of the first places in North America visited by theMoon's shadowon April 8, totality in Durango lasted about 3 minutes and 46 seconds. Solar Eclipse Imagery: Notable Submissions to APOD Tomorrow's picture: palm tree pinholes <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

Palm Tree Partial Eclipse

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 13 Palm Tree Partial Eclipse Image Credit &Copyright:Lori Haffelt Explanation: Only thosealong the narrow trackof the Moon's shadow on April 8 saw a total solar eclipse.But most of North America still saw a partial eclipse of the Sun.From Clearwater, Florida, USA thissingle snapshot captured multiple images of thatmore widely viewed celestial event without observing the Sun directly.In the shadeof a palm tree, criss-crossing frondsare projecting recognizable eclipse images on the ground,pinhole camera style. In Clearwater the maximum eclipse phase was about 53 percent. Solar Eclipse Imagery: Notable Submissions to APOD Tomorrow's picture: Sunday's Childe <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

Eclipse in Seven

APOD: 2024 April 11 - Eclipse in Seven Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 11 Eclipse in Seven Image Credit &Copyright:Xiaofeng Tan Explanation: Start at the upper left above and you can follow the progress ofApril 8'stotal eclipse of the Sun in seven sharp, separate exposures.The image sequence was recorded with a telescopeand camera located within thenarrow path of totality as theMoon's shadowswept across Newport, Vermont, USA.At center is a spectacular view ofthe solar corona.The tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun is only easily visible tothe eye in clear dark skies during the total eclipse phase.Seen from Newport,the total phase for this solareclipse lasted about 3 minutes and 26 seconds. Monday's Eclipse Imagery: Notable Submissions to APOD Tomorrow's picture: the beginning and the end <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

Total Totality

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2024 April 12 Total Totality Image Credit &Copyright:Daniel Korona Explanation: Baily's beadsoften appear at the boundaries of thetotal phase of an eclipse of the Sun.Pearls of sunlight still beaming through gaps in therugged terrain alongthe lunar limb silhouette, their appearance is recordedin this dramatic timelapse composite.The series of images follows the Moon's edge frombeginning through the end of totality during April 8's solar eclipsefrom Durango, Mexico.They also capture pinkish prominences of plasmaarcing high above the edge of the active Sun.One of the first places in North America visited by theMoon's shadowon April 8, totality in Durango lasted about 3 minutes and 46 seconds. Solar Eclipse Imagery: Notable Submissions to APOD Tomorrow's picture: palm tree pinholes <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Amber StraughnSpecific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy,Accessibility NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.