A Partial Eclipse of an Active Sun

APOD: 2022 November 2 - A Partial Eclipse of an Active Sun Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. A Partial Eclipse of an Active Sun Video Credit: Ralf Burkart; h/t Maciej Libert (AG) Explanation: Watch for three things in this unusual eclipse video. First, watch for a big dark circle to approach from the right to block out more and more of the Sun.This dark circle is the Moon, and the video was made primarily to capture this partial solar eclipse last week.Next, watch a large solar prominence hover and shimmer over the Sun's edge.A close look will show that part of it is actually falling back to the Sun.The prominence is made of hot plasma that is temporarily held aloft by the Sun's changing magnetic field.Finally, watch the Sun's edge waver.What is wavering is a dynamic carpet of hot gas tubes rising and falling through the Sun's chromosphere -- tubes known as spicules.The entire 4-second time-lapse video covers a time of about ten minutes, although the Sun itself is expected to last another 5 billion years. Partial Solar Eclipse in October 2022:...

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M33: The Triangulum Galaxy

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 November 3 M33: The Triangulum Galaxy Image Credit &Copyright: Processing -Robert GendlerData -Hubble Legacy Archive,KPNO,NOIRLab,NSF,Aura,Amateur Sources Explanation: The small, northern constellationTriangulumharbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33.Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or justthe Triangulum Galaxy.M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in theLocalGroup of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and ourown Milky Way.About3 million light-years from the Milky Way,M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of theAndromeda Galaxy andastronomersin these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views ofeach other's grand spiral star systems.As for the view from the Milky Way,thissharp image combines data from telescopes on and around planetEarth to show off M33's blue star clustersand pinkish star forming regions alongthe galaxy's loosely wound spiral arms.In fact, thecavernous NGC 604is thebrightest star forming region, seen here at about the 1 o'clock positionfrom the galaxy center.Like M31, M33's population of well-measured variable starshave helped make this nearby spiral a cosmic yardstick forestablishingthe distancescale of the Universe. Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space <| Archive| Submissions | Index|...

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NGC 6357: The Lobster Nebula

APOD: 2022 November 1 - NGC 6357: The Lobster Nebula Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 November 1 NGC 6357: The Lobster Nebula Image Credit: CTIO/NOIRLab/DOE/NSF/AURA;Processing: T. A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab), J. Miller (Gemini Obs./NSF’s NOIRLab), M. Zamani & D. de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab) Explanation: Why is the Lobster Nebula forming some of the most massive stars known?No one is yet sure. Cataloged as NGC 6357, the Lobster Nebula houses the open star cluster Pismis 24 near its center -- a home to unusually bright and massive stars. The overall red glow near the inner star forming region results from the emission of ionized hydrogen gas. The surrounding nebula, featured here, holds a complex tapestry of gas, dark dust, stars still forming, and newly born stars. The intricate patterns are caused by complex interactions between interstellar winds, radiation pressures, magnetic fields, and gravity. The image was taken with DOE's Dark Energy Camera on the 4-meter Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.NGC 6357 spans about 400 light years and lies about 8,000 light years away toward the...

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A Partial Eclipse of an Active Sun

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. A Partial Eclipse of an Active Sun Video Credit: Ralf Burkart; h/t Maciej Libert (AG) Explanation: Watch for three things in this unusual eclipse video. First, watch for a big dark circle to approach from the right to block out more and more of the Sun.This dark circle is the Moon, and the video was made primarily to capture this partial solar eclipse last week.Next, watch a large solar prominence hover and shimmer over the Sun's edge.A close look will show that part of it is actually falling back to the Sun.The prominence is made of hot plasma that is temporarily held aloft by the Sun's changing magnetic field.Finally, watch the Sun's edge waver.What is wavering is a dynamic carpet of hot gas tubes rising and falling through the Sun's chromosphere -- tubes known as spicules.The entire 4-second time-lapse video covers a time of about ten minutes, although the Sun itself is expected to last another 5 billion years. Partial Solar Eclipse in October 2022: Notable Submissions to APOD Tomorrow's picture: open...

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NGC 6357: The Lobster Nebula

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 November 1 NGC 6357: The Lobster Nebula Image Credit: CTIO/NOIRLab/DOE/NSF/AURA;Processing: T. A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab), J. Miller (Gemini Obs./NSF’s NOIRLab), M. Zamani & D. de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab) Explanation: Why is the Lobster Nebula forming some of the most massive stars known?No one is yet sure. Cataloged as NGC 6357, the Lobster Nebula houses the open star cluster Pismis 24 near its center -- a home to unusually bright and massive stars. The overall red glow near the inner star forming region results from the emission of ionized hydrogen gas. The surrounding nebula, featured here, holds a complex tapestry of gas, dark dust, stars still forming, and newly born stars. The intricate patterns are caused by complex interactions between interstellar winds, radiation pressures, magnetic fields, and gravity. The image was taken with DOE's Dark Energy Camera on the 4-meter Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.NGC 6357 spans about 400 light years and lies about 8,000 light years away toward the constellation of the Scorpion. Tomorrow's...

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LDN 43: The Cosmic Bat Nebula

APOD: 2022 October 31 - LDN 43: The Cosmic Bat Nebula Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 31 LDN 43: The Cosmic Bat Nebula Image Credit & Copyright: Mark Hanson and Mike Selby;Text: Michelle Thaller (NASA's GSFC) Explanation: What is the most spook-tacular nebula in the galaxy? One contender is LDN 43, which bears an astonishing resemblance to a vast cosmic bat flying amongst the stars on a dark Halloween night. Located about 1400 light years away in the constellation Ophiuchus, this molecular cloud is dense enough to block light not only from background stars, but from wisps of gas lit up by the nearby reflection nebula LBN 7. Far from being a harbinger of death, this 12-light year-long filament of gas and dust is actually a stellar nursery. Glowing with eerie light, the bat is lit up from inside by dense gaseous knots that have just formed young stars. Celebrate: Halloween With NASA Online Tomorrow's picture: massive stars <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official:...

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Night on a Spooky Planet

APOD: 2022 October 30 - Night on a Spooky Planet Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 30 Night on a Spooky Planet Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Vetter(Nuits sacrées) Explanation: What spooky planet is this?PlanetEarth of course, on a dark and stormy night in 2013 at Hverir, a geothermally active areaalong thevolcanic landscapein northeastern Iceland.Triggered by solar activity,geomagnetic stormsproduced theauroral display in the starry night sky.The ghostly towers of steam and gas are ventingfrom fumarolesand danced against the eerie greenish light.For now, auroral apparitions are increasing asour Sunapproaches amaximum in its11 year solar activity cycle.And pretty soon,ghostlyshapes maydance in your neighborhood too. Tomorrow's picture: big bat <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

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LDN 43: The Cosmic Bat Nebula

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 31 LDN 43: The Cosmic Bat Nebula Image Credit & Copyright: Mark Hanson and Mike Selby;Text: Michelle Thaller (NASA's GSFC) Explanation: What is the most spook-tacular nebula in the galaxy? One contender is LDN 43, which bears an astonishing resemblance to a vast cosmic bat flying amongst the stars on a dark Halloween night. Located about 1400 light years away in the constellation Ophiuchus, this molecular cloud is dense enough to block light not only from background stars, but from wisps of gas lit up by the nearby reflection nebula LBN 7. Far from being a harbinger of death, this 12-light year-long filament of gas and dust is actually a stellar nursery. Glowing with eerie light, the bat is lit up from inside by dense gaseous knots that have just formed young stars. Celebrate: Halloween With NASA Online Tomorrow's picture: massive stars <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy...

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LDN 673: Dark Clouds in Aquila

APOD: 2022 October 29 - LDN 673: Dark Clouds in Aquila Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 29 LDN 673: Dark Clouds in Aquila Image Credit &Copyright: Frank Sackenheim, Josef Poepsel, Stefan Binnewies(Capella Observatory Team) Explanation: Part of a dark expanse that splitsthe crowded plane of our Milky Way galaxy, the Aquila Rift arcsthrough planet Earth's skiesnear bright star Altair.In eerie silhouette against the Milky Way's faintstarlight,its dusty molecular clouds likely contain raw materialto form hundreds of thousands of stars andastronomers searchthe dark clouds for telltale signs of star birth.This telescopic close-uplooks toward the region at afragmented Aquila dark cloud complex identified as LDN 673,stretching across a field of view slightly wider than the full moon.In the scene, visible indications ofenergetic outflows associatedwith young starsinclude the small red tinted nebulosity RNO 109 above and right ofcenter, and Herbig-Haro objectHH32 below.These dark clouds might look scary,but they're estimated to be some 600 light-years away.At that distance, this field of view spans about 7 light-years. Tomorrow's picture: a dark and spooky night<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss|...

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Night on a Spooky Planet

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 30 Night on a Spooky Planet Image Credit & Copyright: Stéphane Vetter(Nuits sacrées) Explanation: What spooky planet is this?PlanetEarth of course, on a dark and stormy night in 2013 at Hverir, a geothermally active areaalong thevolcanic landscapein northeastern Iceland.Triggered by solar activity,geomagnetic stormsproduced theauroral display in the starry night sky.The ghostly towers of steam and gas are ventingfrom fumarolesand danced against the eerie greenish light.For now, auroral apparitions are increasing asour Sunapproaches amaximum in its11 year solar activity cycle.And pretty soon,ghostlyshapes maydance in your neighborhood too. Tomorrow's picture: big bat <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA Science Activation& Michigan Tech. U.

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Seven Years of Halley Dust

History's first known periodic

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LDN 673: Dark Clouds in Aquila

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 29 LDN 673: Dark Clouds in Aquila Image Credit &Copyright: Frank Sackenheim, Josef Poepsel, Stefan Binnewies(Capella Observatory Team) Explanation: Part of a dark expanse that splitsthe crowded plane of our Milky Way galaxy, the Aquila Rift arcsthrough planet Earth's skiesnear bright star Altair.In eerie silhouette against the Milky Way's faintstarlight,its dusty molecular clouds likely contain raw materialto form hundreds of thousands of stars andastronomers searchthe dark clouds for telltale signs of star birth.This telescopic close-uplooks toward the region at afragmented Aquila dark cloud complex identified as LDN 673,stretching across a field of view slightly wider than the full moon.In the scene, visible indications ofenergetic outflows associatedwith young starsinclude the small red tinted nebulosity RNO 109 above and right ofcenter, and Herbig-Haro objectHH32 below.These dark clouds might look scary,but they're estimated to be some 600 light-years away.At that distance, this field of view spans about 7 light-years. Tomorrow's picture: a dark and spooky night<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU)...

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Sunset, Moonset, Taj Mahal

APOD: 2022 October 27 - Sunset, Moonset, Taj Mahal Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 27 Sunset, Moonset, Taj Mahal Image Credit &Copyright: Neelam and Ajay Talwar(TWAN) Explanation: On October 25th, Sun and New Moon settogetheras seen from Agra, India.Their close conjunctionnear the western horizon, a partial solareclipse, was captured in this elevated view in hazy skies near thesolitary domeof the Taj Mahal.Of course, thepartial solar eclipsewas also seen from most of Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East,and western parts of Asia.This eclipse was the last of two solar eclipses (both partial eclipses)in 2022.But the next Full Moonwill slide through planet Earth's shadow on November 7/8, in atotal lunar eclipse. Tomorrow's picture: comet's return<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA ScienceActivation& Michigan Tech. U.

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Seven Years of Halley Dust

History's first known periodic

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Cocoon Nebula Wide Field

APOD: 2022 October 26 - Cocoon Nebula Wide Field Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 26 Cocoon Nebula Wide Field Image Credit & Copyright: Andy Ermolli Explanation: When does a nebula look like a comet? In this crowdedstarfield, covering over two degrees within the high flyingconstellation of the Swan (Cygnus),the eye is drawn to the Cocoon Nebula.A compact star forming region,the cosmic Cocoonpunctuates a nebula bright in emission and reflection on the left,with a long trail of interstellar dust clouds to the right, makingthe entire complex appear a bit like a comet.Cataloged as IC 5146, the central bright head of the nebula spans about 10 light years,while the dark dusty tail spans nearly 100 light years. Both are located about 2,500 light years away.The bright star near the bright nebula's center, likely only a few hundred thousand years old, supplies power to the nebular glow as it helpsclear outa cavity in the molecular cloud's star forming dust and gas.The long dusty filaments of the tail, although dark in this visible light image, are themselves hiding stars in the process of formation,...

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Sunset, Moonset, Taj Mahal

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 27 Sunset, Moonset, Taj Mahal Image Credit &Copyright: Neelam and Ajay Talwar(TWAN) Explanation: On October 25th, Sun and New Moon settogetheras seen from Agra, India.Their close conjunctionnear the western horizon, a partial solareclipse, was captured in this elevated view in hazy skies near thesolitary domeof the Taj Mahal.Of course, thepartial solar eclipsewas also seen from most of Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East,and western parts of Asia.This eclipse was the last of two solar eclipses (both partial eclipses)in 2022.But the next Full Moonwill slide through planet Earth's shadow on November 7/8, in atotal lunar eclipse. Tomorrow's picture: comet's return<| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff(MTU) &Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip NewmanSpecific rights apply.NASA WebPrivacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD atNASA /GSFC,NASA ScienceActivation& Michigan Tech. U.

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Jupiter Rotates as Moons Orbit

APOD: 2022 October 25 - Jupiter Rotates as Moons Orbit Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. Jupiter Rotates as Moons Orbit Video Credit & Copyright: Makrem Larnaout Explanation: Jupiter and its moons move like our Sun and its planets.Similarly, Jupiter spins while its moons circle around.Jupiter’s rotation can be observed by tracking circulating dark belts and light zones.The Great Red Spot, the largest storm known, rotates to become visible after about 15 seconds in the 48-second time lapse video.The video is a compilation of shorts taken over several nights last month and combined into a digital recreation of how 24-continuous hours would appear.Jupiter's brightest moons always orbit in the plane of the planet's rotation, even as Earth’s spin makes the whole system appear to tilt. The moons Europa,Ganymede, and Io are all visible, with Europa's shadow appearing as the icy Galilean moon crosses Jupiter's disk. Jupiter remains near opposition this month, meaning that it is unusually bright, near to its closest to the Earth, and visible nearly all night long. Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator Tomorrow's picture: longer than a comet <| Archive|...

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Cocoon Nebula Wide Field

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 26 Cocoon Nebula Wide Field Image Credit & Copyright: Andy Ermolli Explanation: When does a nebula look like a comet? In this crowdedstarfield, covering over two degrees within the high flyingconstellation of the Swan (Cygnus),the eye is drawn to the Cocoon Nebula.A compact star forming region,the cosmic Cocoonpunctuates a nebula bright in emission and reflection on the left,with a long trail of interstellar dust clouds to the right, makingthe entire complex appear a bit like a comet.Cataloged as IC 5146, the central bright head of the nebula spans about 10 light years,while the dark dusty tail spans nearly 100 light years. Both are located about 2,500 light years away.The bright star near the bright nebula's center, likely only a few hundred thousand years old, supplies power to the nebular glow as it helpsclear outa cavity in the molecular cloud's star forming dust and gas.The long dusty filaments of the tail, although dark in this visible light image, are themselves hiding stars in the process of formation, stars that can be...

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Clouds Around Galaxy Andromeda

APOD: 2022 October 24 - Clouds Around Galaxy Andromeda Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2022 October 24 Clouds Around Galaxy Andromeda Image Credit & Copyright: Andrew Fryhover Explanation: What are those red clouds surrounding the Andromeda galaxy?This galaxy, M31, is often imaged by planet Earth-based astronomers.As the nearest large spiral galaxy, it is a familiar sightwith dark dust lanes, bright yellowish core, andspiral arms traced by clouds of bright blue stars. A mosaic of well-exposed broad and narrow-band image data, this deep portrait of ourneighboring island universe offers strikingly unfamiliar features though, faint reddish clouds of glowingionized hydrogen gas in the same wide field of view.Most of the ionized hydrogen clouds surelylie in the foreground of the scene, well within our Milky Way Galaxy.They are likely associated with the pervasive, dustyinterstellar cirrusclouds scattered hundreds of light-years above our own galactic plane.Some of the clouds, however, occur right in the Andromeda galaxy itself, and some in M110, the small galaxy just below. Tomorrow's picture: jupiter moves <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar| RSS| Education| About APOD| Discuss| > Authors & editors: Robert...

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Jupiter Rotates as Moons Orbit

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe isfeatured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. Jupiter Rotates as Moons Orbit Video Credit & Copyright: Makrem Larnaout Explanation: Jupiter and its moons move like our Sun and its planets.Similarly, Jupiter spins while its moons circle around.Jupiter’s rotation can be observed by tracking circulating dark belts and light zones.The Great Red Spot, the largest storm known, rotates to become visible after about 15 seconds in the 48-second time lapse video.The video is a compilation of shorts taken over several nights last month and combined into a digital recreation of how 24-continuous hours would appear.Jupiter's brightest moons always orbit in the plane of the planet's rotation, even as Earth’s spin makes the whole system appear to tilt. The moons Europa,Ganymede, and Io are all visible, with Europa's shadow appearing as the icy Galilean moon crosses Jupiter's disk. Jupiter remains near opposition this month, meaning that it is unusually bright, near to its closest to the Earth, and visible nearly all night long. Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator Tomorrow's picture: longer than a comet <| Archive| Submissions | Index| Search| Calendar|...

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